The Teenage Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Survival Guide to Raising Adolescents and Young Adults (Harper Paperbacks, 2016)

Teenage Brain book

Image courtesy of ©Harper Paperbacks

Title:

The Teenage Brain

Subtitle:

A Neuroscientist’s Survival Guide to Raising Adolescents and Young Adults

Author:

Frances E. Jensen M.D. with Amy Ellis Nutt

Review…

Opinion in short:

Star rating 4

A must-read book for brain info junkies. Not for those looking for practical “how to” solutions. Technical and accessible. A definite for those working with troubled young people – or those parents who want more info on the inner-workings of the teen/s they love!

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The Chimp Paradox (Random House, 2012)

This is my first completed book of 2016. I want to start making book reviews a bigger feature of the website – so here goes…

Image courtesy ©Random House Publishing

Image courtesy ©Random House Publishing

Title:

The Chimp Paradox

Subtitle:

The Acclaimed Mind Management Programme to Help you Achieve Success, Confidence and Happiness

Author:

Prof. Steve Peters

Opinion in short:  

Star rating 3.5

Overall, a book well worth reading. A bit too long – the main juicy stuff is in the first 3 or 4 chapters, but there are some helpful application sections later on.

Very good for illustrating the difference between different parts of the human psyche, with tons of examples and illustrations on how to apply it all.

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Child Development: A Practical Introduction (London: SAGE, 2014)

Photo ©SAGE

Photo ©SAGE

I’ve just bought this book, as I was looking for something up to date on child development.

Next week I’m training for three days soon on attachment, the neurobiological impact of trauma, behavioural responses to abuse, etc. and wanted to read something to refresh the old brain cells.

This book looks like just the job. I’ve read the sections on brain development and Piagetian child development and they were excellent. It’s summarises the issues very well and the language is clear and accessible – free from the usual labyrinthine academic terminology (see what I mean!). Clear and simple is better.

Kevin also provides additional reading tips, questions to encourage learning and bullet point summaries of each chapter. It’s a book worth having for anyone working with children and young people.

I’ll write more when I’ve finished reading it.

My next post will probably be about the need for people working with troubled young people to know their child development. This book will be a good prep for that…