The Teenage Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Survival Guide to Raising Adolescents and Young Adults (Harper Paperbacks, 2016)

Teenage Brain book

Image courtesy of ©Harper Paperbacks

Title:

The Teenage Brain

Subtitle:

A Neuroscientist’s Survival Guide to Raising Adolescents and Young Adults

Author:

Frances E. Jensen M.D. with Amy Ellis Nutt

Review…

Opinion in short:

Star rating 4

A must-read book for brain info junkies. Not for those looking for practical “how to” solutions. Technical and accessible. A definite for those working with troubled young people – or those parents who want more info on the inner-workings of the teen/s they love!

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Strengths:

  • This is a very interesting book for people with a fascination about the detailed working of the teenage brain. Packed full of really interesting neurological stuff!
  • Different areas of the brain are covered in some detail but without the inaccessible medical language that makes some books unreadable to the lay person. Clear and well written.
  • There is a logical order to the book which reads like a natural progression of chapters, each leading to the next.
  • There are chapters specific to certain issues that teenagers face – like use of alcohol and drug use – these are enlightening (I’ll go back and look at these again in more depth as the need arises)!
  • A detailed analysis of the interface between brain science and the criminal justice system is given, raising ethical questions for sentencing (U.S. context).

Weaknesses:

  • Despite the thorough nature of the content from a scientific and medical point of view, there is precious little by way of practical help. It’s less of a survival guide (see the subtitle) and more of a reference/information guide to the workings of the brain itself.
  • The book is written by an American so this needs to be born in mind as the illustrations, historical references and criminal justice system referred to are all U.S. focussed.
  • Many of the examples are of high-flying young people – phrases like “star student,” “Grade “A” pupil” and “Harvard student” abound and dilute the impact of otherwise useful illustrations.
  • There are woeful inaccuracies about the U.K. educational system. The most glaring of which is the belief that the 11-plus exam still determines the secondary education of U.K. children.
  • No treatment of the impact of developmental trauma on development.


Check out my new eBook here… ‘Looking After No.1 – Self-Care for People Working with Troubled Children’

Photo courtesy of © 123rf/Ion Chiosea (adapted)

Photo courtesy of © 123rf/Ion Chiosea (adapted)

Disclosure of material connection: Some of the links in this post are “affiliate links.” This means that if you click the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers.

Continue reading... » | | Posted in Books
Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above may be “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. Cheers, JM.

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